Students' experiences in Neuroscience

Natasha Doshi

Natasha Doshi

Sophomore, Clinical Neuroscience and Biology double major, University Honors

I am a second-year Stamps Scholar living in the Honors Residential Commons (HRC.)  Since coming to Virginia Tech, I fell in love with the neuroscience program’s dynamic and challenging curriculum. Meeting with the welcoming and supportive neuroscience faculty and advisors solidified my decision to pursue it as a major.

This year, I am looking forward to taking more in-depth neuroscience classes and exploring the multitude of majors within the School of Neuroscience. I am also excited to get more involved in Virginia Tech’s Honors College as a peer educator.

Outside of classes, I'm an active member of Active Minds and Delta Chi Gamma. I also enjoy volunteering in Blacksburg, including assistant coaching a youth soccer team. 

 

Danielle Garrett
Danielle Garrett

Danielle Garrett

Senior, Cognitive & Behavioral Neuroscience dual degrees, minor in Leadership and Social Change

I am a senior from Forest, VA pursuing dual degrees in Cognitive & Behavioral Neuroscience and Psychology, with a minor in Leadership and Social Change.

During the summers following my sophomore and junior years of college, I have worked for Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth in Baltimore, Maryland as the Neuroscience Teaching Assistant. Through this opportunity, I have had the honor of sharing my knowledge gained at Virginia Tech with some of the brightest high school students in the world. I have given numerous lectures, on topics ranging from basic neuroanatomy, genetic applications to neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, and the neuroscience of language. I have also been able to lead classroom activities, design my own labs, and help students complete their research projects. Being able to apply my neuroscience knowledge and skillsets outside the realm of a college lecture hall or a research laboratory has been the most valuable way to spend my summers in college, and given me a greater appreciation for the field of education.

During the school year at Virginia Tech, I serve as the president of Hokie Ambassadors: the student organization of campus tour guides. Additionally, I have worked in research labs both in the Department of Psychology and in the School of Neuroscience, and have served as a teaching assistant for the Leadership and Social Change Residential College.

After graduation, I intend to purse a masters degree in Speech Language Pathology and I know that my background in neuroscience will be of utmost value.

Christine Faunce

Christine Faunce

Christine Faunce

Junior, Experimental Neuroscience and Chemistry double major, University Honors

Hi, there! My name is Christine Faunce and I am a third-year student studying Experimental Neuroscience and Chemistry.  The development of the School of Neuroscience was a driving factor in my decision to attend Virginia Tech. The School’s mission for embracing individuality and creativity was an essence that I had not felt at any other school. Throughout my coursework at Virginia Tech, I have developed a passion for chemistry along with furthering my fascination with the human brain, which is why I decided to dual degree in Chemistry. I am hopeful to combine these interests in a neuropharmacology Ph.D. program upon graduation with the thought of eventually pursuing a career in pharmaceutical patent law.

During my time at Virginia Tech, I have supplemented my coursework with volunteer ambassador programs, pre-law clubs, and cultural enrichment programs. As an Honors College Admissions Liaison, School of Neuroscience Ambassador, Student Intellectual Property Society Vice President, and Resident Advisor, I strive to positively represent women in STEM to underclassmen and cultivate communities of civility among students of diverse backgrounds. I joined Dr. Matt Buczynski’s research lab during my sophomore year. In Dr. Buczynski’s lab, our research goal is to create an effective, non-invasive drug exposure and dependency model in mice to eventually test and develop novel therapeutics for addiction and related neurological disorders. I have been fortunate enough to be supported by the Honors College at Virginia Tech through two separate Enrichment Grants, one of which financially assisted my opportunity to continue my undergraduate research during the summer of 2018. Working with Dr. Buczynski and the entire research team has been an unparalleled opportunity to gain experience with nicotine pharmacokinetics, liquid-liquid extraction methods, and behavioral analyses of mice.

Sid Madhavan

Sid Madhavan

Sid Madhavan

Junior, Clinical Neuroscience, minor in Leadership and Social Change, University Honors

My interest in Neuroscience started early, when my middle school science teacher said we would not cover the brain in class because she didn’t know enough about it and that the material was too complicated for her to understand, let alone explain. I was instantaneously hooked on the idea that our most important body part was also the most mysterious, and that spark soon became a flame.

I spent the first two years of my undergraduate career in the lab of Dr. Matthew Buczynski, researching nicotine addiction. I won the Fralin SURF award as a freshman and spent a summer hard at work running behavioral assays and cell culture. This past summer I joined the lab of Dr. Bin Xu and began work, researching protein misfolding, funded by the Commonwealth Health Research Board. I focused on the role of Tau Proteins in Alzheimer’s Disease and other Dementias. During the semester, I will continue this research and will also be investigating a link between Alzheimer’s Disease and Type II Diabetes.

During the academic year, I will involve myself as a College of Science Representative in Student Government, the Undergraduate Liaison to the Virginia Tech Commission on Research, and as an Ambassador for both the School of Neuroscience and the Office of Undergraduate Research.
I will seek knowledge where I can find it, and spread it to those who will listen. I am blessed to be a part of the neuroscience community at Virginia Tech, and would not choose to live my life any other way.

Ali Toloczko

Ali Toloczko

Ali Toloczko

Senior, Dual Degree in Chemical Engineering and Clinical Neuroscience, University Honors

I am a senior working towards a dual degree in chemical engineering and clinical neuroscience. I came to Virginia Tech with two opposing dreams: to become a neurosurgeon and to get an engineering degree. Math was always something that came naturally to me; I could easily do problems in my head before other students finished. Additionally, growing up I loved figuring out how things work and how to maximize efficiency. Therefore, engineering seemed like the ideal career for me, but over time I realized engineering and medicine are tied more closely than most people imagine. Chemical engineering is built off the construction of systematic chemical schemes. Combine that with a solid understanding of the principles of neuroscience and I offer a unique skillset that can further me in the healthcare field.

Over my time at Virginia Tech, I have gotten to experience so many unique opportunities. I have spent almost 3 years in research so far, created and carried out a research project through the SURF program, and have been able to present my work at multiple different schools. This past year I had the idea to create the first, Mid-Atlantic Undergraduate Research Conference at Virginia Tech. I was inspired by my experience at the Harvard Conference, and wanted to bring together the brightest, most diverse minds at Virginia Tech. This conference will be held in March 2019 and will be open to applications from students of all different STEM backgrounds. In addition to research, I have spent my time in two Greek organizations, Zeta Tau Alpha and Delta Epsilon Mu, I volunteer at the local hospital and through College Mentors for Kids, and I have helped run Relay for Life. I truly believe that life is short, so we should make the most of all the opportunities that come our way.